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2012 SEAPLANE ACCIDENTS

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2012 SEAPLANE ACCIDENTS

Unread postby Float Pilot » Mon Nov 18, 2013 4:16 pm

During 2012 the NTSB logged in about 1,570 aircraft accidents and incidents. Only a handful involved seaplanes. Here they are....



NTSB Identification: WPR13CA05514 CFR Part 91: General AviationAccident occurred Saturday, November 24, 2012 in Needles, CAProbable Cause Approval Date: 03/13/2013Aircraft: PIPER PA18, registration: N2224Injuries: 2 Uninjured.
NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.
The flight instructor was providing instruction to the airline transport pilot in a float-equipped airplane. During the flight instructor’s demonstration of a water landing, the airplane was misaligned with the intended landing path when it impacted the water’s surface. A post-accident examination revealed that the airframe was substantially damaged during the resultant hard landing.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The flight instructor, while demonstrating a water landing to the pilot receiving instruction, did not maintain proper alignment with the landing surface, which resulted in a hard landing.



NTSB Identification: ANC13FA00114 CFR Part 91: General AviationAccident occurred Sunday, October 07, 2012 in Aleknagik, AKProbable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2013Aircraft: GRUMMAN G-44, registration: N139FInjuries: 1 Fatal.
NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
The pilot of the twin-engine seaplane was en route to a remote lake to pick up passengers. A passenger who was awaiting pickup witnessed the accident and said that when the airplane arrived in the area, it made multiple passes over the lake and island where he was waiting. After the third pass, the airplane came into view very low over the water. The airplane banked to the left, and the left wing float struck the water. The airplane veered sharply to the left, bounced, and cartwheeled three times. The airplane came to rest, partially submerged, with its high-mounted wings level with the surface of the water. The witness was unable to reach the airplane due to the icy water, and the airplane subsequently sank in the lake and was not recovered. The witness did not see the pilot.The witness reported that the weather conditions at the time of the accident consisted of calm wind, low clouds, light rain, and fog restricting the visibility. He further described the water as glassy. It is likely that, due to visibility and water conditions, the pilot misjudged the height above the surface of the lake during a low pass, resulting in the left wing float inadvertently contacting the surface of the lake.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's decision to make multiple low passes over the glassy surface water, which resulted in an impact with the surface of the lake.




NTSB Identification: ANC12GA11414 CFR Public UseAccident occurred Sunday, September 30, 2012 in Anchorage, AKAircraft: QUEST AIRCRAFT COMPANY LLC KODIAK 100, registration: N745Injuries: 1 Uninjured.
This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. : NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this public aircraft accident report.
On September 30, 2012 about 1550 Alaska daylight time, an amphibious float-equipped Quest Aircraft Kodiak 100 airplane, N745, sustained substantial damage while landing at the Lake Hood Seaplane Base, Anchorage, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) cross-country government flight, under Title 14, CFR Part 91, when the accident occurred. The airplane was operated by the U.S. Department of Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The commercial certificated pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a VFR flight plan had been filed. The flight originated at the King Salmon Airport, King Salmon, Alaska, about 1300, and had completed a planned stop in Kenai, Alaska, before continuing to Anchorage, the flights final destination for the day.During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge (IIC) on October 2, the pilot said the accident flight originated at the King Salmon Airport, stopped briefly in Kenai, and continued to Anchorage. Before landing, the pilot said she configured the airplane for a water landing, by confirming the wheels were in the up position. She noted that her airspeed during the approach to the lake was slightly faster than normal. During touchdown, the airplane veered to the left, and then to the right. The airplane then veered violently to the right, as though it “caught a float” and the right wing struck the water. The airplane then pivoted abruptly to the right, cartwheeled, and the wreckage began to sink. The pilot stated that there were no pre-accident anomalies with the airplane. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings, empennage, and fuselage during the accident.The accident airplane was equipped with a set of Wipline 7000 amphibious floats, which were designed specifically for the Quest Kodiak 100 airplane. A postaccident inspection confirmed that the wheels were in the up position.The closest weather reporting facility is Anchorage International Airport, approximately 1 mile west of the accident site. About 8 minutes after the accident, at 2353, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) at Anchorage, Alaska, reported wind calm, visibility, 10 statute miles, few clouds at 6000 feet, scattered clouds at 13,000 feet, scattered clouds at 20,000 feet, temperature, 45 degrees F; dew point 29 degrees F; altimeter, 30.02 inHG. At the time of the accident a pilot rated witness standing on the north shoreline of Lake Spenard stated the airplane appeared to touchdown in a slight nose-low attitude. After touchdown the airplane veered left and right, and rolled from side-to-side. The airplane nosed over abruptly, and came to rest inverted.


NTSB Identification: ANC12CA11514 CFR Part 91: General AviationAccident occurred Sunday, September 30, 2012 in Port Lions, AKProbable Cause Approval Date: 12/19/2012Aircraft: CESSNA 182A, registration: N2028GInjuries: 2 Uninjured.
NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.
Prior to departure, the commercial pilot attempted to remove ice and snow contamination from the wings of the float-equipped airplane, but some contamination remained. During the takeoff run, the airplane failed to become airborne before reaching the end of the lake. The airplane slid along a gravel spillway for several hundred feet before nosing over. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings, empennage, and fuselage. The pilot stated that there were no preaccident anomalies with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. The pilot noted that the accident might have been avoided if he had removed all the frozen contamination from the wing or waited for above-freezing temperatures.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's decision to take off with ice- and snow-contaminated wings.




NTSB Identification: CEN12LA66114 CFR Part 91: General AviationAccident occurred Thursday, September 27, 2012 in Kenosha, WIProbable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2013Aircraft: LAKE LA4, registration: N1127LInjuries: 1 Uninjured.
NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
The accident flight was the airplane’s first flight after its annual maintenance inspection was completed. The pilot stated that the pretakeoff engine run-up was normal; however, during the takeoff, the engine started to "sputter”; the pilot continued the flight straight ahead, but the engine subsequently lost total power, and the pilot performed a forced landing to a grassy area. Examination and test run of the engine did not reveal any abnormalities that would have precluded normal operation.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined because examination and test run of the engine did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.



NTSB Identification: ANC12CA10114 CFR Part 91: General AviationAccident occurred Tuesday, September 04, 2012 in Ekwok, AKProbable Cause Approval Date: 12/19/2012Aircraft: PIPER PA-18-150, registration: N4127ZInjuries: 1 Minor.
NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.
The pilot was taking off near a river bank in a float-equipped airplane. During the initial climb, the pilot was distracted by the water rudders and looked inside the airplane. During that moment of inattention, the airplane turned toward the river bank and impacted trees. There were no reported preaccident mechanical anomalies with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's diverted attention during the initial climb, which resulted in a collision with trees.



NTSB Identification: ANC12LA09614 CFR Part 91: General AviationAccident occurred Sunday, September 02, 2012 in Willow, AKProbable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2013Aircraft: TAYLORCRAFT AVIATION CORP. F21, registration: N2005EInjuries: 1 Serious.
NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
During takeoff from a lake in a float-equipped airplane, the pilot said the airplane became airborne, but the engine began to lose power. The pilot said that he did not think the airplane would clear the trees at the end of the lake, so he started a right turn to stay over the water. As he steepened the turn, the airplane stalled and impacted the lake.The pilot said the outside temperature was about 55 degrees Fahrenheit and that it was raining. He reported that the more he thought about the circumstances, the more he believed that the loss of power was the result of carburetor ice. The weather conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to serious icing conditions at any engine power setting. No preaccident mechanical problems that would have precluded normal operation were reported.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain control of the airplane after a loss of engine power during takeoff due to carburetor




NTSB Identification: ANC12FA09514 CFR Part 91: General AviationAccident occurred Friday, August 31, 2012 in Homer, AKProbable Cause Approval Date: 08/13/2013Aircraft: BELLANCA 7GCBC, registration: N57511Injuries: 1 Fatal.
NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
The airplane's wreckage was located about 10 miles from its departure point in the shallow waters of a river leading to the remote destination lake. At the accident location, the river is crossed by high-tension power lines. The lines were draped across the river from the high terrain on the south side of the river to the low terrain on the north side of the river. One of the power lines had been severed. All of the cables were marked with large orange marking balls, and the power lines are marked on the aeronautical sectional chart for the area.Postaccident examination of the airframe or engine did not reveal evidence of any pre-impact malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The airplane collided with the high-tension power lines and sustained substantial damage during impact with terrain. Marginal visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area at the time of the accident. It is likely that the pilot did not see the power lines in time to avoid them.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to see and avoid high tension power lines.

NOTE: I watched this guy take-off in a 50 foot ceiling of fog and light rain. The cable he hit was only 60 feet above the river. He made the mistake of thinking his GPS was going to let him fly in total IFR conditions up a canyon.


NTSB Identification: ANC12CA092Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & CommuterAccident occurred Saturday, August 25, 2012 in Kenai, AKProbable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2012Aircraft: DEHAVILLAND BEAVER U-6, registration: N314HAInjuries: 3 Minor,3 Uninjured.
NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.
The pilot of a float-equipped airplane was landing at a remote lake. The pilot stated that he was on a left base leg turning onto a short final approach when the left float struck the ground. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The pilot indicated there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate ground clearance during his landing approach, which resulted in a collision with terrain.



NTSB Identification: ANC12LA07514 CFR Part 91: General AviationAccident occurred Saturday, July 14, 2012 in Kenai, AKAircraft: PIPER PA-18-150, registration: N7154ZInjuries: 2 Uninjured.
This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
On July 14, 2012, about 1515 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped Piper PA-18 airplane, N7154Z, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing shortly after takeoff from a remote lake about 6 miles north of Kenai, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) cross-country personal flight under Title 14, CFR Part 91, when the accident occurred. The pilot and the sole passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight was en route to the Lake Hood Seaplane Base, Anchorage, Alaska.During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on April 14, the pilot reported that just after takeoff, as the airplane climbed to 100 feet above the water, the engine began to vibrate so violently that he was concerned that the engine may possibly separate. He reduced engine power, turned the airplane left to avoid trees at the departure end of the lake, and attempted an emergency landing on the lake. During the turn, the airplane continued to descend, and it subsequently collided with a shallow portion of the lake. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings, fuselage, and empennage.The pilot reported that a postaccident examination revealed that a 6-inch portion of the propeller was missing. The airplane was equipped with a McCauley, two-bladed, fixed pitch, metal propeller, model number DES1A175. A portion of the fractured propeller blade was sent to the NTSB's Materials Laboratory for examination, and results are pending.
Index for Jul2012 | Index of months


NTSB Identification: ANC12FA07314 CFR Part 91: General AviationAccident occurred Tuesday, July 10, 2012 in Homer, AKProbable Cause Approval Date: 11/06/2013Aircraft: CESSNA U206G, registration: N206VRInjuries: 1 Fatal,4 Minor.
NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
The pilot reported that while landing in a southerly direction on a lake, a gust of wind lifted the left wing just after touchdown, and the right wing struck the water. The airplane nosed over abruptly, and the cabin immediately filled with water. The pilot estimated the wind to be from 130 degrees at 10 knots, with peak gusts between 12 to 14 knots. However, a pilot-rated witness who observed the accident from the southeastern shoreline of the lake reported that the wind was strong and gusty out of the northeast at 20 to 25 knots at the time. He thought the accident airplane was on a downwind leg, but it was on final approach. He said that the airplane had a very fast ground speed and touched down slightly nose down in a left-float-low attitude. The nose of the left float dug into the water, the left wing struck the water, and the airplane rapidly nosed over.A postaccident examination revealed no evidence of a mechanical malfunction or failure with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. Based on the pilot-rated witness’s statement and the damage to the airplane and its floats, it is likely that the pilot misjudged the wind conditions and landed with a strong, gusty tailwind. The airplane then contacted the rough water with the left float low and nosed over.On this airplane, the right rear cargo door is blocked by the wing flap when it is extended. After the accident, the pilot and three of the passengers were able to egress the airplane by bending that door and sliding through the small opening that they created. The fourth passenger was unable to exit through the door; however, due to the nature of her injuries, it is unlikely that the blocked exit contributed to her death.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s improper evaluation of the weather conditions and his subsequent downwind water landing in gusting wind conditions, which resulted in a nose-over.
Full narrative available
Index for Jul2012 | Index of months


NTSB Identification: ANC12CA060Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & CommuterAccident occurred Monday, July 02, 2012 in Ketchikan, AKProbable Cause Approval Date: 10/09/2012Aircraft: DEHAVILLAND BEAVER DHC-2, registration: N1018AInjuries: 6 Uninjured.
NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.
The pilot of the float-equipped airplane reported that he planned to step taxi while making a left turn and then takeoff. He applied takeoff power to get the airplane on step, then reduced power, and started a turn to the left. The airplane turned to the left sharper than he anticipated. He applied right rudder and reduced left aileron. As the turn started to straighten out, the airplane’s right wing struck the water and sustained substantial damage. There were no preaccident mechanical issues with the airplane.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control during a step turn on floats.

NTSB Identification: ANC12LA04614 CFR Part 91: General AviationAccident occurred Friday, June 01, 2012 in Skwentna, AKProbable Cause Approval Date: 02/27/2013Aircraft: CESSNA A185F, registration: N1795RInjuries: 2 Uninjured.
NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
The private pilot and one passenger departed from a lake on a personal cross country flight. During the pilot’s preflight check, he noted that the right wing fuel tank contained about 32 gallons of fuel, and the left wing fuel tank contained about 5 gallons of fuel. About 8 miles south of the departure lake, at an altitude of about 2,000 feet mean sea level, the airplane’s engine lost power. The pilot said that he turned on the fuel boost pump, and the engine rpm rose momentarily but dropped again. He stated that he did not recall checking the fuel selector valve as part of his emergency restart procedures. He executed a forced landing in a marsh.The pilot stated that he always operated the airplane with the fuel selector valve in the “Both Tanks On” position; however, a postaccident inspection of the airplane revealed that the airplane’s fuel selector valve was in the “Left Tank Only” position. A postaccident engine run revealed no mechanical anomalies with the engine, and it operated normally at all power settings. An annual inspection of the airplane was completed on May 20, 2012, and the airplane had flown approximately four hours since the inspection.Both the normal “Before Takeoff” and the “Emergency Landing without Engine Power” checklists direct the pilot to check the fuel selector valve position. Given the lack of mechanical deficiencies with the airplane's engine and the discovery of the fuel selector valve in the “Left Tank Only” position, it is likely that the pilot did not check the fuel selector valve either during his preflight or after the loss of engine power. Considering the amount of fuel noted in the left wing fuel tank during the pilot’s preflight, it is also likely that the engine lost power due to fuel starvation.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper fuel management, which resulted in fuel starvation and a total loss of engine power in cruise flight. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's failure to follow the checklist after the loss of engine power.



NTSB Identification: CEN12LA29614 CFR Part 91: General AviationAccident occurred Sunday, May 13, 2012 in Hanover Township, MIProbable Cause Approval Date: 01/15/2013Aircraft: MAULE M-7-420AC, registration: N420RPInjuries: 1 Minor,1 Uninjured.
NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
The pilot departed from a lake in a seaplane, circled, and flew back over the lake. He then saw another lake nearby and decided to land on it. On the downwind leg of the landing, the engine lost power. During the descent toward the lake, the airplane struck trees next to the shore and subsequently went into the water. The pilot and passenger exited the airplane and swam to shore. The fuel selector was found in the OFF position. Two gallons of fuel were drained from the left tank. The right tank was ruptured when the wing struck the tree, and there was evidence of fuel spray on the tree. An examination of the turbine engine failed to reveal a reason for the loss of power. The fuel pump was tested and met factory specifications. While the main fuel control contained only residual fuel, it also tested in accordance with factory specifications; given the presence of fuel after the accident, the investigation was unable to conclude that this was the cause of the power loss. Further, the propeller governor and overspeed governor tested in accordance with factory specifications and electrical power was applied to the Welden fuel pump, which operated normally.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined during an exhaustive postaccident examination of the engine and its components.




NTSB Identification: WPR12CA15114 CFR Part 91: General AviationAccident occurred Sunday, April 01, 2012 in Lake Havasu City, AZProbable Cause Approval Date: 05/15/2012Aircraft: LAKE LA-4-200, registration: N32LBInjuries: 2 Uninjured.
NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.
The pilot stated that he was performing a water landing in a cove with gusty wind conditions. The airplane touched down twice and, on the third touchdown, veered violently to the left. He believed that he either “chined and waterlooped” or that the left sponson contacted the water first. Both sponsons and the left wing tip were substantially damaged. Additionally, the left side of the airplane’s nose and left fuselage at the pilot entry station were wrinkled and bent.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot did not maintain directional control during a water touchdown.

NTSB Identification: ANC12LA026Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & CommuterAccident occurred Tuesday, March 13, 2012 in Ketchikan, AKProbable Cause Approval Date: 10/09/2012Aircraft: DEHAVILLAND BEAVER DHC-2, registration: N82SFInjuries: 1 Serious,1 Minor.
NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
The pilot departed from an off-airport site in marginal visual flight rules conditions. Shortly after departure, the weather worsened, and flight visibility dropped to near zero in heavy snow. He attempted to follow the shoreline at a low altitude but was unable to maintain visual contact with the ground. He stated that he saw trees immediately in front of the airplane and attempted a right turn toward what he thought was an open bay. During the turn, the right float contacted a rock outcrop, and the airplane impacted the water. The pilot did not report any mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's decision to depart in marginal visual meteorological conditions, and his continued visual flight into instrument meteorological conditions.
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Re: 2012 SEAPLANE ACCIDENTS

Unread postby Tim McCormack » Mon Nov 18, 2013 8:14 pm

The posting of this was very good timing. I used it in my comment on the Destin Florida seaplane regulation debate. See that thread.
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Re: 2012 SEAPLANE ACCIDENTS

Unread postby cubdriver2 » Tue Nov 19, 2013 12:16 am

I don't think this list is accurate. I know of 4 down here not on the list. A G44 down by Kingston Ny, a Lake over by Saratoga NY, a Top Cub by Big Moose NY and a Supercub in 7th lake.

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Re: 2012 SEAPLANE ACCIDENTS

Unread postby cubdriver2 » Tue Nov 19, 2013 12:19 am

cubdriver2 wrote:I don't think this list is accurate. I know of 4 down here not on the list. A G44 down by Kingston Ny, a Lake over by Saratoga NY, a Top Cub by Big Moose NY and a Supercub in 7th lake.

Glenn


plus that 206 in NH
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Re: 2012 SEAPLANE ACCIDENTS

Unread postby cubdriver2 » Tue Nov 19, 2013 12:30 am

Tim McCormack wrote:The posting of this was very good timing.


Oops, just noticed 2012

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Re: 2012 SEAPLANE ACCIDENTS

Unread postby Float Pilot » Tue Nov 19, 2013 1:48 am

Since 2013 is not complete yet, I thought it might be jumping the gun...

I may have missed a couple because the NTSB is bad about stating the gear type.

There were a couple more Lake Amphib wrecks in 2012, but they were operating from runways, so I did not count them...

It is a big pain to read through all the reports looking for floats or lake in the narrative...
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Re: 2012 SEAPLANE ACCIDENTS

Unread postby jjbaker » Tue Nov 19, 2013 2:10 am

I appreciate you posting those here, Alex. God knows that database is a BITCH to search.
Once spend 4 hours just trying to get after seaplanes and it is downright impossible due to mis-categorizations and lack of gear information for amphibs.

2013 has lots of opportunities left to put one in, so I wouldn't search those yet. 2013 is going to be a frustratingly long list, too.
Fixed a couple of formatting issues and bolded the cause, as well.
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Re: 2012 SEAPLANE ACCIDENTS

Unread postby psafran » Tue Nov 19, 2013 8:16 am

A huge thank you for the time it took to do that.

A good review &reminder to be careful.

Have to remember to read it again in the Spring.
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