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Ham Radios

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Ham Radios

Unread postby CFII » Tue Jul 07, 2015 7:18 pm

The gunsmith that did the muzzle brake had a bunch of 1940-1970s shortwave radios sitting around and after buying a few I learned he had a friend with old Ham receivers that work so I thought about acquiring one of them too, just to listen in occasionally. After looking more on the interweb I saw handheld 100W units and portables for under $100.00 up to about $600.00 and was wondering if the cheap one is worth having for WTSHTF emergency scenario. The family is within 10 miles but, a hill in the way anybody know if communication is still capable with these units?
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Re: Ham Radios

Unread postby RKittine » Wed Jul 08, 2015 6:38 am

The most reliable Long Range Communications radios available covered by the Ham Bands are the ones called HF (High Frequency) radios as compare to VHF and UHF, Yep V for Very and U for Ultra.

The HF or Low Band Radios usually cover from 160 meters through 10 meters and the newer ones cover through 6 meter. There are Portable 100 watt units, but not really hand held. They draw to much current and would need at least a hefty 12 (13.6) volt car radio.

Compact ones of modern design such as the ICOM IC-706 MK II-G can be had for from $400 to $600 depending on condition. To that you would need a battery (can be set as low as 5 watts for low current draw and as high as 100 watts if you have the current available or a 110 volt to 13.6 volt power supply) and solar charger or some other way to keep the battery up and a Resonant Antenna or a wire and an outbound antenna turner. Radios like this also cover 2 meter VHF and 440 MHZ UHF bands. There are repeaters on the 2meter and 440 band and it could be possible that you can reliably get around (via a repeater on a nearby mountain) your obstacle very reliability using low power FM. These systems are set up all over the country by Hams and Ham Groups for OEM use as well as just fun and personal communication. (I have one for sale by the way. Like New with the box, original manual, mike and everything else that goes with it. :D )

In addition to covering the Ham Bands in multi mode - Upper and Lower Side Band, CW (Morse Code) Am and FM, the newer ones have full coverage receivers which include AM Aircraft, as well and on UHF Military the military air band. Though they do not transmit out of the Ham Bands, they can be "Unlocked" and then will do so as well as being able to cover the marine HF bands. Many boaters buy Ham Radios for their off shore HF SSB set up as they are half the price of a dedicated Marine SSB unit with more features.

Hope that helps. Feel free to give me a call on East Coast time to answer any questions you might have.

Bob

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Re: Ham Radios

Unread postby 9aplus » Fri Jul 10, 2015 7:00 am

+1 on above
and
Nice positive experience for using of small FT-817 with DSP for aviation AM band
monitoring, when conditions are marginal...

817 is almost hand-held, low power and can be more than useful in emergency but can not be used like primary option.
ELT is standard option in aviation, but to often because of many reasons can not perform good enough.
Than we have modern small devices like SPOT or DeLorme InReach, both can sustain 1m immersion

My opinion is that combination of all above can bring your chances to communicate in emergency on acceptable level.

73 de 9A4DB

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Re: Ham Radios

Unread postby RKittine » Fri Jul 10, 2015 7:25 am

The Yaesu unit is nice and can also be had in a low / high power unit. Lots of options. If you do have reliable repeater coverage in your area, then two Hand Held (HTs for Handi Talky) on 2 meters, 220, or 440 can be a less expensive and less bulky option. No additional power supply (except to charge) or antenna other than the one on the unit, are needed.

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Re: Ham Radios

Unread postby RKittine » Fri Jul 17, 2015 5:34 am

Still have a hardly used ICOM FT-706 MKII G for sale.

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