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Is It Time Aviation Goes The Next Step?

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Re: Is It Time Aviation Goes The Next Step?

Unread postby KlausNW » Fri Jan 12, 2018 3:51 pm

Yes, the 'Sport Pilot' will just be a name change to "Single-Passenger". The only change I would request to the FAA is drop the "Gross Weight" restriction. I can see absolutely nothing safe about shaving structural integrity just because we say so. The wheels are already in motion to make the current Sport Pilot medical a BasicMed. Don't believe the FAA when they say it's not, I've been to two seminars where the topic came up. As a trade I would say drop the gross weight rule for the BasicMed rule. Everything else stay the same.

So this is what many in the industry I think, don't understand. "Quality instead of Quantity". We have tried every which way to Sunday to make it easier and easier to become and be a 'Private Pilot'. Look at the results. You can find the results in the headlines and on the NTSB reports.

When a pilot with a Single-Passenger license has an accident and it hits the headlines it will have a lesser affect on the public. Just like the local media reporting of fatal car crashes, it will light up the news for a couple days and go away. When pilot kills more then two people it becomes a big deal and the FAA is confronted. The families of these fatalities want answers. If you and I die in an aircraft accident the news article will talk about how we "loved" to fly and wouldn't have it any other way.

"Liability".... it's the reason for high insurance, ridiculous requirements to approve an aircraft or part. We have let the word "Liability" take over aviation industry. "Liability" is how we end every whining session complaining about cost and regulations. "Liability" must be confronted.

Pilots who want to fly non-aviation people around have to become better pilots 'Period'. We know that flying is safer then the statistics show but, I can't make flying safer by wishing it to be. We have to train and continue to train and continue to educate. Just because you flew for an hour or two with an examiner doesn't mean the learning is over. Yet, I have flown with countless number of pilots that have very little to no stall practice since initial private pilot training or a bi-annual. One pilot even told me that he won't ride with an instructor that has him do a stall. He said the regulations require that he recognizes a stall not do it. He wasn't the only one either.

Flying passengers is a great responsibility and we have to accept the lower completion rate of "Multi-Passenger License" holders. Both the Aircraft and the Pilot need to be a higher standard. So yes, I propose that the Private Pilot License be totally eliminated. To fly VFR with two or more passengers you and your aircraft need to be IFR current.

I know how radical this proposal must sound to the status quo but, It's a trade off for cheaper aircraft operation cost. Trade annual training and higher performance standards for lower accident rate statistics. It's all a trade off, maybe we'll have less pilots flying at this higher standard but the ones that are will be more qualified.
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Re: Is It Time Aviation Goes The Next Step?

Unread postby RKittine » Fri Jan 12, 2018 4:43 pm

I totally agree that the Light Sport Aircraft category should not have been limied to 600 Kilos (1,320 pounds) like the Europeans. I have had pilots with a 1,000 or more hours in a C-172 transition to a slab wing LSA 70 year old Champ or Cub, go through a stall series and use "Coordinated Aileron and Rudder to level and low wing and go right into the spin entry. A lot easier to ground loop a tail dragger too. With the thousands of C-150s and Cherokee `140s, it would have been better to up the MGW from the git go.

The applicant can ask to do what ever they want to review in a flight review (officially no longer called a Biennial Flight Review, though still required every 24 months or les) and you as an instructor can agree or not agree. Since there is no pass / fail you either sign them off or don't.

I have seen plenty of press on accidents involving only two people in an airplane, in many cases a student and an instructor rather than a pilot and a passenger, so I am not sure I buy that a plane with 4 people in that crashes is so much more newsworthy than one that crashes with only the pilot or a pilot and a passenger. I have seen law suits against surviving pilots and instructors for aircraft accidents.

I give you a lot of credit Klaus for putting the time and effort into making positive changes. It will be interesting to see what the outcome is. The simple course allowing one to do their own annuals on a Light Sport Aircraft with only 16 hours of instruction, I thought was also a little too to easy.

Bob
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Re: Is It Time Aviation Goes The Next Step?

Unread postby KlausNW » Fri Jan 12, 2018 11:26 pm

Every single fatality is bad for aviation but, all the non-aviation passengers are blindly trusting us not to kill them. If I tell a passenger that I'm only licensed to carry one passenger they may change their mind and not go or understand that I meet a lower standard. The word will be out in the public what Single-Passenger means just like the "experimental" sticker on the side of a homebuilt.

I know you, I and the next pilot are totally affected by the loss of a pilot. None of my family are pilots. Family dinners will bring up the latest accident and the pilot, usually a friend of mine, is not given much sympathy by the folks around the dinner table. My family would instead talk about how they know someone who knows someone that knew the passenger and how sad they feel for the family. Often I'll be sitting in a bar over hearing people talking about the latest accident on the TV. Often the people will blame the pilot for messing up and killing the passengers.

The only answer I have is to stop the aviation deaths especially the non-aviation public.

After 50 plus years, what do you think will stop accidents? The airlines have shown us that it is a worthy goal. The airlines may have the biggest accident ever tomorrow but until they do.... General Aviation should do something.
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Re: Is It Time Aviation Goes The Next Step?

Unread postby RKittine » Sat Jan 13, 2018 10:49 am

Want to stop aircraft accidents - Ground everyone and put them on trains and increase the train fatalities. I understand there is no easy fix. I am all for better trained pilots. Always thought that although 40 hours (35 under Part 141) as a minimum was too low, even to be a License to Learn, but just added time is not always the best learning experience, hence the issue with the 1,500 hours requirements for FOs. Of course increase the number of hours, lessons and up goes the upfront expense and down goes the pilot starts.

So how about one Pilots License - Super Duper Airperson Deluxe - You are a student from Student Class I through Student Class XX and then become SDAD Pilot after 10,000 hours of accident free time.

But seriously, maybe something like that following and expanding what we have:

Student Pilot then Endorsements to cover
Solo Pilot
Unrestricted Solo Pilot over Un Populated Areas
Unrestricted Solo Pilot
VFR Pilot Plus one Passenger
VFR Multi Passenger Pilot
Instrument Solo Pilot
Instrument Plus One Passenger Pilot
Instrument Plus Multi Passenger Pilot
On at infinitum until Multi Engine, Seaplane, For Hire, For Hire Part 135, For Hire Part 121 .............. Hence my Student I through XX

Well, I think we are all in agreement that we want better and safer pilots, but if there are not more pilots then we will again see the discontinuation of new light aircraft construction with no one buying or renting them and again an ever aging aircraft fleet.

Ops, forgot Hi Performance, Complex, Tailwheel, High Altitude, Pressurized , Center Line Thrust, .......

Bob
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Re: Is It Time Aviation Goes The Next Step?

Unread postby RKittine » Sat Jan 13, 2018 2:49 pm

On a return to seriousness, why not take baby steps to improve things.

Example, The Flight Review, once called the Biennial Flight Review, is not Pass / Fail and although there has been changes to it over the years, the only real change has been that it now must be 1 hours of ground and 1 hours of flight minimum. The issue becomes, there are not set requirements other than that. I do not even have to be in the aircraft and have done them from ground observation. You can of course get credit for the ground portion if you have renewed you CFI and if you take a checkride for a new rating (pass / fail) or get a new endorsement, tailwheel etc., you are covered.

So some will take flight review, the CFI will not sign them off and then they go to the next CFI until they find one that will.

Since I was licensed prior to 1968, I took my Commercial in a Cherokee 140 as no complex time was required. I flew a tailwheel aircraft prior also so no tailwheel endorsement was required, not pressurized, hi altitude, complex or hi performance. My multi did not require an instrument portion though that though my Airline Transport Rating on my Commercial license did, even though that changed radically when it became a license at the ATP. I was even able to voluntarily trade it for other concessions.

I ask all my flight review students, what they would like to review and work on, but I always chop and engine and require a stall series. In addition on planes with flaps, I fail the flaps and am surprised how many have not made a No Flap Landing in years. When I started all landings were power off, no flap, except short field. Today, in my experience, all the new pilots flying planes like the 172, are taught that a normal landing is with 20 to 30 degrees of flaps.

So why not a specific minimum requirement for what needs to be reviewed on the Flight Review? I know that making all CFI examiners, does not work, but if we put in a log book, Flight Review instruction, but did not include the endorsement, then the next CFI would at least know what the situation is and still have to go through the same requirements.

Then how about age. I know a pilot with a stint that normally required a medical review every year and for what ever reason has made it through BasicMed. He is 82 and I worry about him, but he is now good for another 4 years if he does not self ground himself when he should.

Making the Flight Review more comprehensive my solve some of these issues.

Then lets talk about CFIs. I got my CFI in 1968 and have never taken a recurrency ride. I have either shown my log book and number with the number of pass or fails I had sent for check rides, or Flight Reviews I have given, or in the past years just taken the online renewal course, printed the certificate and get renewed. For at least my last 5 renewals, I have not had to show proficiency or even ANY flight hours.

Then lastly (for this post) the insurance companies may see things differently, for those of us who carry insurance.

Bob
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Re: Is It Time Aviation Goes The Next Step?

Unread postby KlausNW » Sat Jan 13, 2018 3:15 pm

To keep the easy street open for student start-ups and completions, look for creative improvements to the "Single Passenger License". Insure the student gets completely and thoroughly through the syllabus but in the very shortest time possible.

The liability game will never change it's are out of our and everyone's hands. Many times the industry has presented liability wavers for the passenger to sign and they where reversed in court. The most common answer to a liability waver is: " I wouldn't have signed it if I thought there would be an accident".

The two most powerful tools to harnessing the liability monster:

Homebuilt aircraft - where the builder is an individual with limited personal value. The lawyers rarely try to get blood from a stone. If the builder is not rich enough that the lawyer will get his $200-$300/ hour fee he won't take the case.

The "SIGNATURE" - If you want to separate the MEN from the boys/girls? Just ask the person to sign their work or statement. The legal industry does back flips when they can find an individual who signed a document before an accident. It's a easy peasy case for a lawyer to make a big buck. Everyone knows this, so most pilots and mechanics will stop and think what they're signing.

As an experiment, I created a form at the flight school where the PIC must put their signature on a pre-flight and leave with the dispatch before takeoff. The form was acknowledging the safety of the plane and flight parameters (Weight & Balance, weather, TFR's, notams). The entertainment value alone made it a fun experiment. The same pilots that couldn't quote a single FAR the day before where able to recite the whole FAR/AIM and straighten me out on the regulations. The instructors confirmed without a doubt that there's absolutely no regulation that supports that form. I let the instructors in on the experiment and watch the next three or four days go by. The Pre-Flight form was only turned in half the time and only two or three out of 50 where ever signed.

The Pre-Flight form experiment came about because an owner was whining about the cost of his Annual. Even though I explained before the Annual that I'm a "Preventive Maintenance" mechanic not a retroactive mechanic and why. "When I sign off the Annual it puts me in the liability spotlight for 12 calendar months." Like you would expect he forgot his checkbook and credit cards the day he came to pick the aircraft up. That gave me the opportunity to create the Pre-Flight form. I handed it to him and explained to the owner/operator that he was only signing it off for one quick flight around the patch. I would tell you what was said next but the forum would be shut down.
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Re: Is It Time Aviation Goes The Next Step?

Unread postby cubdriver2 » Sun Jan 14, 2018 12:06 am

Eddie Rickenbacker who was a WW1 ace and later in charge of Eastern Airlines and had a boatload of common sense was asked while running Eastern if flying was safe? His reply was " no, but its relatively safe "

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